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Turtle nail clippings: discoveries from Ningaloo Reef News

by Jasmine, 21 August 2020 | 0 comments

Photo of a turtle with an aerial on it's back, swimming in blue water.

By Natalie Kikken Did you know that nails grow on a turtle’s flippers? At Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, turtle nail clippings are providing new and exciting insights. CSIRO scientists can work out what turtles eat by analysing the chemicals in these nail samples.

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Working at the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness News

by David, 4 June 2020 | 2 comments

By Andrea Wild Imagine you’re a scientist working on SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing the disease COVID-19. Your lab is at the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness (ACDP) in Geelong, Victoria.

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The buzz on Asian Giant Hornets News

by David, 21 May 2020 | 1 comments

Image of a wasp

By Andrea Wild Are killer hornets really on the loose in North America? Asian Giant Hornets are a species of wasp, Vespa mandarinia. They normally live in Japan, China and Southeast Asia. But late last year they arrived in Canada and the USA, probably inside a shipping container. It only takes one hornet to start…

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The Double Helix COVID-19 explainer Update

by David, 20 March 2020 | 4 comments

Microscopic image of coronavirus stained red.

As part of the media coverage of the new coronavirus disease (COVID-19), we thought it was important to explain the situation for young readers. Here’s a chance to get your head around the biology from the basics.

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Protecting paintings with flow chemistry News

by David, 21 November 2019 | 0 comments

Gloved hand painting with a brush onto a work of art.

Have you ever wondered why many old paintings are so shiny? It’s not the paint they used – it’s a varnish that’s applied on top of the paint. These chemicals are designed to enhance and protect precious artworks. And CSIRO just formulated a new varnish that’s taking the art world by storm!

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Cricket on The Dish! News

by David, 18 October 2018 | 0 comments

Several people playing cricket on The Dish.

If you’ve ever seen the iconic movie The Dish, you’ll probably remember when two engineers turned the most famous telescope in Australia into a cricket pitch. Kids from across New South Wales got a chance to do the same, along with some of Australia’s biggest cricket stars.

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Why is CSIRO releasing mosquitoes? News

by David, 19 July 2018 | 4 comments

Image of two mosquitoes.

There are plenty of reasons to hate mosquitoes. They are annoying, hard to catch, and their bites can itch for days. But they’re not just irritating – in many places they spread diseases such as malaria, Zika and dengue.

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Modern recipes for ancient grains News

by David, 23 February 2018 | 0 comments

Image of a bowl of muffins and some bags labeled Teff

You’ve heard of rice and wheat. You may have heard of maize and quinoa. But have you heard of teff? This ancient grain has been feeding the people of Ethiopia for thousands of years. And thanks to the work of CSIRO, it might soon be feeding you too!

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This supercomputer is super-fast, and super-cool News

by David, 7 July 2017 | 0 comments

A diagram illustrating undergraound lakes fedin into a supercomputer.

A few kilometres from the centre of Perth sits the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre. This futuristic building contains several supercomputers, including the fastest computer in the southern hemisphere, Magnus. Pawsey is dedicated to supporting science, but it takes a lot of science to keep the building running.

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Measuring malaria on your breath News

by David, 27 February 2017 | 1 comments

A scientist standing near a computer, analysing malaria.

It’s really annoying to get bitten by a mosquito. Your skin often swells, and the bite can itch for days. But in many places in the world, that small bite isn’t just annoying. It can cause a life-threatening disease: malaria.

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