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Why is CSIRO releasing mosquitoes? News

by David, 19 July 2018 | 4 comments

Image of two mosquitoes.

There are plenty of reasons to hate mosquitoes. They are annoying, hard to catch, and their bites can itch for days. But they’re not just irritating – in many places they spread diseases such as malaria, Zika and dengue.

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Potpourri preservation Activity

by David, 8 March 2018 | 3 comments

A bowl filled with dried rose petals, orange peel and cinnamon sticks

Learn about the different parts of plants, as well as the science of preservation, by making your own pretty potpourri. Safety: Vegetable peelers are sharp. Ask an adult to help.

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Scientists discover Octlantis News

by David, 20 November 2017 | 0 comments

A gloomy octopus

It was once thought octopuses were not very social animals. They seem to keep to themselves, only meeting to fight or mate. It turns out that’s not always the case. A social octopus should consider moving to Octlantis.

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Pop goes the bearcat News

by David, 23 October 2017 | 0 comments

bearcat lying down

Written by Mike McRae An animal that smells of popcorn sounds more like a creature from a fairy tale than from reality. But the bearcat, found in Southeast Asia, is a real-life fantastic beast known for its unusual popcorn scent. The source of its smell, though, is hardly appetising.

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The language of time News

by David, 5 October 2017 | 0 comments

A sand timer on a road.

How do you imagine time? Is it a road, with the future fading off into the distance? Or is it an ocean, slowly draining as we spend our precious seconds? Surprisingly, the way you imagine time might affect the way you experience it!

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Wild weeds of the subantarctic News

by David, 22 August 2017 | 0 comments

A scientists studies the ground as pengins walk past

Interview by Nic Gill Double Helix talks to weed hunter and botanist, Laura Williams. Read on to find out about her research on Macquarie Island, a remote subantarctic island fondly referred to as ‘Macca’.

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Weird and wacky spiders Book

by David, 10 August 2017 | 4 comments

A small, furry spider.

Some of Australia’s spiders have terrifying names. Funnelweb and Redback are names that scream danger. Even the helpful Huntsman Spider sounds like it could be out to get you. But not all spiders have scary names. How would you feel about meeting a spider called Sparklemuffin?

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Microscope: Sleepy sunshine News

by David, 12 April 2017 | 0 comments

Double Helix magazine is looking for your science questions! Our Microscope column answers the thorniest science queries you can throw at us. Email us at Helix.Editor@csiro.au or via our contact details below and you could have your question published. Here’s a sample question to get you thinking. Aisha Goshti asks: Why does the Sun makes…

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Measuring malaria on your breath News

by David, 27 February 2017 | 1 comments

A scientist standing near a computer, analysing malaria.

It’s really annoying to get bitten by a mosquito. Your skin often swells, and the bite can itch for days. But in many places in the world, that small bite isn’t just annoying. It can cause a life-threatening disease: malaria.

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What’s wrong with our tomatoes? News

by David, 7 February 2017 | 0 comments

A bunch of rite tomatoes on a bush.

They’re bright red, a bit crunchy, and they don’t really taste like much. The standard tomatoes you can buy in a supermarket are a bit boring to eat. But if you’ve ever grown tomatoes yourself, you’ll know how sweet and full of flavour they can be. So what’s happened to the humble tomato?

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