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A cracking look at the world of fossilized dinosaur eggs News

by David, 19 April 2016 | 1 comments

A big red rock with lots of smaller gray lumps in it.

Written by Julia Cleghorn Almost two years ago, we reported on the discovery of a special fossilized dinosaur specimen – the first pterosaur egg preserved in 3D! Pretty impressive, huh? Since then, there have been some other interesting finds.

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Feral fences’ funny fail News

by David, 6 April 2016 | 0 comments

A dark, spotty quoll.

The Aussie bush was once full of cute, furry creatures. But these days, quolls, bandicoots and bettongs have a hard time keeping safe from feral foxes and wild dogs. So how can we protect our native animal friends? Out at Mulligan’s Flat Woodland Sanctuary on the outskirts of Canberra, the rangers built fences to protect…

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Burp! Excuse us News

by Jasmine, 24 March 2016 | 0 comments

A cow eating hay.

In a recent blog post we reported on farts, a type of methane emission. When talking about these emissions, we made an omission. That is, we should have mentioned burps as well as farts.

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New theory for eco-friendly kangaroo farts News

by Jasmine, 22 February 2016 | 0 comments

Two kangaroos

Written by Julia Cleghorn Cow farts and burps are a big, smelly problem. They contain a lot of methane – a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. Kangaroos, on the other hand, produce a lot less methane when they toot.

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Discovering DNA’s repair crew News

by David, 16 October 2015 | 0 comments

a DNA spiral. Tw ocoloued blobs surround it.

Hidden within our cells, DNA is the hard drive of the human body. Each copy of DNA contains instructions for all the proteins needed to make a person. But this creative compendium is always under attack. This year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to three people who found out what’s repairing our genetic treasure.

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Robot assassin protects the reef News

by David, 21 September 2015 | 0 comments

A coral reef. tHere is a spiky starfish with targets drawn on it.

Written by Azmina Hossain The crown-of-thorns is a venomous starfish that lives in the Great Barrier Reef. Growing up to massive lengths of 80 centimetres and having a body entirely covered in toxic spikes, the starfish is almost indestructible and is a vicious predator. They eat coral, the building blocks of the Great Barrier Reef….

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Stick insect comeback News

by David, 4 September 2015 | 1 comments

A large insect on a person's hand

For millions of years, stick insects roamed the beautiful Lord Howe Island. Then one fateful day in 1918, a ship ran aground and fleeing rats decided to make the island home – and stick insects their dinner. Within a few years, people believed the insects were extinct.

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Lolly half-life Activity

by David, 5 May 2015 | 0 comments

Someone is holding a lolly showing the letter 'm'.

What is a half-life? grab a handful of lollies and find out!

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Lasers and drones measure up forests News

by Jasmine, 27 February 2015 | 0 comments

Written by Beth Askham Drones, lasers, planes and liquid nitrogen were all called in to measure the growth of a Tasmanian forest. Sometimes measurement can be a little more exciting than you might think.

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Shhh, you’re hurting my head News

by David, 6 February 2015 | 2 comments

A whale surfacing to breathe.

Written by Beth Askham Researchers have found that whales hear low frequency sounds by amplifying them in their skull bones. Ocean sounds made by humans may be messing with their heads.

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