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How people sense acceleration Activity

by Carol Saab, 11 July 2013 | 1 comments

a diagram of the inner ear.

Where’s your head at? Our ability to sense the rotational movement of our head comes from a set of organs in the inner ear. One of these organs, the utricle, also gives us the ability to sense acceleration.

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Kite mayhem Activity

by Pat, 10 July 2013 | 0 comments

Hand holding the string of a kite as it flies in the air.

Kites are a great way to combine science, playfulness, patience and imagination. So grab a some simple household items and start building!

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A giant step for twin primes News

by David, 10 July 2013 | 0 comments

Dr. Yitang (Tom) Zhang

Three and five. Five and seven. Eleven and thirteen. Prime numbers often appear as twins, only two apart. For hundreds of years, mathematicians have wondered – is there a biggest pair of twin primes, or does the list of twins keep going forever?

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Need some inspiration? News

by Jasmine, 9 July 2013 | 0 comments

A teenage girl

These BHP Foundation Science and Engineering Awards students have done practical research projects, with innovative approaches, using scientific procedures. See what they’ve achieved in the video below. Video transcript available here. Are you up for the challenge? Enter the BHP Science and Engineering Awards!

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The Ancient Greek social network News

by David, 9 July 2013 | 0 comments

An ancient Greek jug with a picture of a man sitting, surrounded by others.

In the last decade, services such as Facebook have provided scientists with lots of information about current friendship links. However, they tell us little about historical friendships. So what might be the structure of an Ancient Greek social network?

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Cold to the core News

by Pat, 5 July 2013 | 0 comments

Ice core being held by gloved hands.

A fridge or freezer can preserve food for weeks, months or years. But that’s nothing compared to glaciers, with layers of ice preserving information about Earth’s climate for thousands of years.

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Discover a changing climate in an ice core Activity

by Mike, 4 July 2013 | 0 comments

Plastic cup with three different layers. The contents are overflowing.

Do you wonder why scientists are down in the Antarctic? One reason is to take ice cores, which keep a record of how the Earth’s climate has changed. To learn more (and make a tasty snack) try this totally cool activity! Safety: When dealing with food, use clean hands and clean equipment. You will need…

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A spinning coin explained Activity

by Carol Saab, 4 July 2013 | 2 comments

A man is looking at a rainbow coloured coin as it spins.

What happens when you spin a coin on a table? It spins and rolls (or ‘spolls’), for starters. How it stops is much more fascinating.

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Connection conniption! Activity

by David, 2 July 2013 | 0 comments

Three factories drawn on a white mug.

Do you have a favourite mug? This is my favourite. Not only does it hold my hot chocolate, it has a wicked tricky puzzle on it!

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Cupcake chemistry Activity

by Pat, 1 July 2013 | 0 comments

Cooking is fun and it’s a great way to make a tasty snack. But have you ever thought about what’s going on when you cook something? Try making some cupcakes, and you’ll pick up a thing or two about chemistry.

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