What's new

technology posts

How to fly without moving News

by David, 6 December 2018 | 0 comments

Futuristic glider plane with blue wings.

If you want to fly, you’ve got to move, right? Birds flap, propellers whirr, and if you’ve ever watched the spiral painted on the middle of a jet engine, you’ll know they spin too. But recently, researchers from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the United States created a plane with no moving parts at all….

Continue reading How to fly without moving

Categories:

The language of the web Activity

by David, 19 April 2018 | 2 comments

Image of an open laptop screen and keyboard.

Have you ever wondered how a web page gets made? It involves using hypertext markup language, HTML. Read on to discover some of the secrets of HTML, then use it to make your own meme.

Continue reading The language of the web

Categories:

A hole in the heart of Egypt’s greatest pyramid News

by David, 12 January 2018 | 0 comments

Image of a pyramid with tiny people in the foreground.

Built more than 4500 years ago, you’d think there was nothing left to discover inside Cairo’s Great Pyramid of Giza. Think again. Scientists have recently discovered a new chamber deep in the heart of the tomb, all with the help of starlight.

Continue reading A hole in the heart of Egypt’s greatest pyramid

Zippy zappy cars

by David, 2 May 2016 | 0 comments

It’s been really busy at Double Helix headquarters in the last few weeks. We’ve moved office, to the CSIRO Discovery Centre in Canberra. There are lots of cool things at our new workplace, including a whole museum of CSIRO science! And when CSIRO staff need to zip into town or out to a research station,…

Continue reading Zippy zappy cars

Categories:

Robot assassin protects the reef

by David, 21 September 2015 | 0 comments

The crown-of-thorns is a venomous starfish that lives in the Great Barrier Reef. Growing up to massive lengths of 80 centimetres and having a body entirely covered in toxic spikes, the starfish is almost indestructible and is a vicious predator. They eat coral, the building blocks of the Great Barrier Reef. It’s said that one…

Continue reading Robot assassin protects the reef

Touchscreen texture

by , 13 February 2015 | 0 comments

Imagine if your touchscreen had texture. Pages, pictures and games would all come to life under your fingertips. Researchers are finding out ways that we can trick out brains into thinking a flat touch screen is a world of texture. They are doing it by understanding the science of touch. We know that when our…

Continue reading Touchscreen texture

Categories:

Super sticking power

by , 12 December 2014 | 0 comments

Researchers have made sticky hand pads that let you climb walls like Spiderman. Inspired by gecko feet, a research lab at Stanford University in America developed the climbing device, which recently allowed a person who weighed 70 kilograms to climb a sheer glass wall. The team have also used the structure of gecko feet to…

Continue reading Super sticking power

Penguin rovers in disguise

by , 21 November 2014 | 1 comments

Researchers have found a better way to study penguin behaviour – send in a remote-controlled rover! Compared with researchers collecting data themselves, rovers were found to be less disruptive to the colony, less stressful for the penguins, and sometimes a whole lot cuter to watch! Animal scientists often need to approach their research subjects in…

Continue reading Penguin rovers in disguise

Categories:

Suit up for space

by , 5 September 2014 | 0 comments

To boldly go out of the airlock, astronauts need to look the part. Donning a spacesuit protects astronauts from the dangerous conditions just beyond our atmosphere. The outer layer of NASA’s Extravehicular Mobility Unit spacesuit is built tough from a blend of three fabrics. One fabric is the same stuff used in bulletproof vests. It…

Continue reading Suit up for space

Crystal clocks and atomic ticks

by , 29 August 2014 | 0 comments

One of our readers requested an article about time keeping devices, and it’s a great time for the topic. Scientists set a new record in clock precision early this year with an atomic clock that ‘ticks’ 430 trillion times in a single second. Most wristwatches and wall clocks today use a quartz crystal to keep…

Continue reading Crystal clocks and atomic ticks