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number posts

Decoding binary numbers Activity

by David, 13 January 2014 | 4 comments

Zeroes and ones on a blue and green background. ©iStock.com\ivanastar

Written by Gabrielle Tramby In this activity you’ll do maths like a computer. It’s a bit tricky, so younger readers may want to read the ‘What’s Happening?’ section first.

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A game of Nim Activity

by David, 24 December 2013 | 1 comments

A single token on a table. Someone is reaching for it.

Grab some tokens and let’s go! Here’s a simple game to play with a friend.

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An Advent puzzle ActivityBrainteaser

by David, 17 December 2013 | 0 comments

Every second door on the calendar is closed.

See if you can work out this puzzle. You might like to use an advent calendar to solve it, or maybe you could work it out in your head first!

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Guess my number Activity

by David, 12 November 2013 | 2 comments

the number 86

Here’s an easy game to try with a friend. All you need is a pen and paper.

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Folding a piece of paper in half Activity

by David, 29 October 2013 | 2 comments

This activity sounds super easy from the title, but there’s more to it than you might expect!

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Measuring money Activity

by David, 8 October 2013 | 0 comments

Jar full of Australian coins. ©iStock.com/CraigRJD

There are some surprising patterns that can be revealed in Australian coins if you take a closer look.

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Birthday paradox Activity

by David, 3 September 2013 | 5 comments

A wrapped gift, a party hat, decorative ribbon, and a cupcake with a lit birthday candle on a calendar. ©iStock.com/Double_Vision

How likely is it that at least two people out of 30 will share a birthday?

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Approximately pi facts about pi approximation day News

by David, 22 July 2013 | 0 comments

1. Pi (or π) is a number that helps describe circles. It links the width of a circle with its perimeter, or the radius of a circle with its area, or the width of a ball and its volume. It’s the same number no matter how big your circle is – about 3.14159265.

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A giant step for twin primes News

by David, 10 July 2013 | 0 comments

Dr. Yitang (Tom) Zhang

Three and five. Five and seven. Eleven and thirteen. Prime numbers often appear as twins, only two apart. For hundreds of years, mathematicians have wondered – is there a biggest pair of twin primes, or does the list of twins keep going forever?

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Napier’s bones Activity

by David, 18 June 2013 | 0 comments

four strips of paper with numbers on them. The top number on each strip is highlighted - 4, 6, 7, 0

How did people multiply before calculators were invented? You could try doing it in your head, but you could also use a mechanical calculator, such as this set of Napier’s bones.

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