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medical and health sciences posts

Why is CSIRO releasing mosquitoes? News

by David, 19 July 2018 | 4 comments

Image of two mosquitoes.

There are plenty of reasons to hate mosquitoes. They are annoying, hard to catch, and their bites can itch for days. But they’re not just irritating – in many places they spread diseases such as malaria, Zika and dengue.

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Microscope: Sleepy sunshine News

by David, 12 April 2017 | 0 comments

Double Helix magazine is looking for your science questions! Our Microscope column answers the thorniest science queries you can throw at us. Email us at Helix.Editor@csiro.au or via our contact details below and you could have your question published. Here’s a sample question to get you thinking. Aisha Goshti asks: Why does the Sun makes…

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Dogs don’t like hugs

by David, 20 May 2016 | 0 comments

Australians love dogs. About 40 per cent of Australian households have a dog. And if you love your dog, you should give it a hug, right? Probably not, new research shows. Stanley Coren, a psychologist and dog expert at the University of British Columbia, searched the internet for pictures of people hugging dogs. In more…

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How tall are you, really? Activity

by David, 30 March 2016 | 0 comments

You will need Masking tape Pencil Bookend (or something with a right angle, such as a set square or hardback book) Tape measure An adult to help, and to experiment on If you’re much shorter than your adult, you’ll need a small ladder, so you can reach the top of their head What to do

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An astronaut’s tall tale

by David, 26 March 2016 | 0 comments

On 2 March this year, two long-term International Space Station residents returned to Earth. Scott Kelly and Mikhail Kornienko both spent 342 days in space. Their year-long mission included space walks and Earth photography. But the most important experiment was on themselves. How does a person react to a year in space? Throughout their expedition,…

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Discovering DNA’s repair crew

by David, 16 October 2015 | 0 comments

Hidden within our cells, DNA is the hard drive of the human body. Each copy of DNA contains instructions for all the proteins needed to make a person. But this creative compendium is always under attack. This year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to three people who found out what’s repairing our genetic treasure.

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The sweet sound of pain relief

by David, 23 January 2015 | 0 comments

Turns out we can thank Rihanna and Taylor Swift for more than just catchy songs. Recent research has revealed that for kids, pain from surgery can be reduced significantly by simply listening to their favourite music! Undergoing major surgery can cause a lot of pain, and often strong drugs are needed. But within 48 hours…

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The secret life of soil

by , 16 January 2015 | 0 comments

Bacteria living in soil could save our lives – if only we knew they existed. A new way of looking at soil bacteria is helping researchers discover new antibiotics. We use antibiotics to help fight infections, such as a festering sore on your arm or a chest infection. Growing in these infections are unwelcome bacteria…

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Ebola outbreak

by , 15 August 2014 | 1 comments

The largest outbreak of Ebola ever recorded is happening in West Africa. Since February this year, more than 1000 people have been killed by the Ebola virus. Last week, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern. Ebola virus is zoonotic, meaning it has the ability to spread from…

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Feeling chirpy?

by Jasmine, 14 August 2014 | 0 comments

Written by Beth Askham Emotions can run high in the twitterverse. Tweets about feelings can now be mapped to find the mood of a city, nation or area. An online tool called We Feel, developed by CSIRO researchers, scans up to 32 000 tweets per minute. It recognises a range of words to judge how…

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