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evolution and genetics posts

Where did whales come from? News

by David, 25 April 2019 | 0 comments

A four legged animal with big sharp teeth is swimming after a fish.

When you think about it, whales seem a bit strange. They live in the ocean, but breathe air. That suggests that millions of years ago, their ancestors walked on land. But the change didn’t happen overnight.

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This DNA has lumps News

by David, 26 April 2018 | 0 comments

Image through a microscope, magnifying spiral strands and shapes on a blue background

Inside most cells in your body, there’s a copy of your entire genetic code. It contains instructions that help build and maintain your body. If you imagine DNA in its double helix form, it’s a beautiful, perfect package. Except, maybe DNA doesn’t always look so perfect after all. A team of Australian researchers just discovered…

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What’s wrong with our tomatoes? News

by David, 7 February 2017 | 0 comments

They’re bright red, a bit crunchy, and they don’t really taste like much. The standard tomatoes you can buy in a supermarket are a bit boring to eat. But if you’ve ever grown tomatoes yourself, you’ll know how sweet and full of flavour they can be. So what’s happened to the humble tomato? It’s not…

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Hard work creates simple life

by David, 5 June 2016 | 0 comments

It takes a lot of information to make a human. It’s kept in our cells as DNA, which contains at least 20 000 genes. Some other forms of life can get by with much less DNA and fewer genes. Now one team of scientists think they’re close to making the simplest living thing possible. The team…

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Getting ahead in bread News

by David, 1 August 2014 | 0 comments

Wheat

Written by Sarah Kellett Wheat is Australia’s main winter crop. Sown in autumn and harvested in spring or summer, it provides us with flour to make our daily bread. We eat wheat as toast with vegemite, or sandwiches for lunch. But wheat is not for everyone

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The worm that wants to be eaten News

by David, 25 October 2013 | 0 comments

A European hare.

Written by Sarah Kellett Atop a blade of grass waits a baby worm. Sheep graze all around in the South Australian pasture, ripping up mouthfuls of juicy greenery. The worm quivers as a mouth nibbles nearby. Then finally, the moment arrives.

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Out of India? News

by Pat, 31 May 2013 | 0 comments

Dingo drinking from a pool.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a long history with their land. They are one of the oldest continuous cultures in the world.

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Back from the dead

by Pat, 12 April 2013 | 0 comments

Thylacine in a zoo.

What do the thylacine, woolly mammoth and gastric-brooding frog all have in common? For one, they’re all extinct – however, there are some scientists who think that the extinction of these animals (and others) might not have to be permanent.

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Royal grave – no parking News

by Pat, 8 February 2013 | 0 comments

Skeleton of King RIchard III showing his curved spine.

The graves of kings and emperors: pyramids in Egypt, terracotta armies in China and … a car park in England? A team from the University of Leicester announced they discovered the remains of King Richard III under a council car park.

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The whole tooth and nothing but the tooth News

by Mike, 2 November 2012 | 0 comments

Skull of a placoderm, an ancient type of fish

Say cheese and flash that beautiful smile. You should be proud of those choppers; after all, teeth have been around for nearly half a billion years.

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