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biochemistry and cell biology posts

Bacteria under Antarctic ice News

by Andrew Wright, 19 September 2014 | 0 comments

Penguin on ice

Written by Caitlin DevorThere’s life under ice. Scientists found an entire community of bacteria living 800 metres under the surface of glaciers in Antarctica. These bacteria rely on each other to survive in the dark, isolated, subzero lake.

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Gold test for diabetes News

by David, 18 July 2014 | 0 comments

Structure of insulin

Written by Sarah Kellett Researchers have made a cheap and rapid new test to diagnose type 1 diabetes using a gold-studded glass chip.

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Perfumes for pests News

by Jasmine, 30 May 2014 | 0 comments

Diagram

Written by Sarah Kellett Cross-species communication between citrus plants, bacteria, jumping plant lice and wasps begins with a fresh, minty smell.

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Art and science News

by Jasmine, 23 May 2014 | 2 comments

Illustration of bacteria

Written by Sarah Kellett The eyes have it. Bright, colourful butterflies and birds easily catch our attention. But to visualise bacteria, we need to get creative, and combine art and science.

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Smelly yellow Poem

by Jasmine, 8 January 2014 | 0 comments

Ashamed dog with puddle of pee

Written by Celia Berrell Regardless if it’s yours or mine, why is urine yellow? It’s mostly made of water yet becomes a stinky fellow! When blood’s red heme is broken down, it goes from brown to gold. You’ll see this if you get a bruise and watch it growing old.

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Bacteria spiked by black silicon News

by Pat, 13 December 2013 | 0 comments

Dragonfly.

Recently we explained how some microbes keep us healthy. Unfortunately, not all microorganisms are helpful, and some cause illness. Recent discoveries could help keep nasties at bay.

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What a corker! News

by Pat, 4 October 2013 | 0 comments

Cross-section of cork bark.

Written by Sarah Kellett Bottles of champagne may send corks sky high, but spacecraft take cork as far as Mars. Their success depends on it. Cork reached new heights as part of the protective aeroshell that insulated the Mars rovers Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity from the intense heat of entering the Martian atmosphere.

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Double Helix – back to basics Activity

by Mike, 18 May 2013 | 2 comments

Adenine molecule marked with an A.

Two centuries ago, nobody knew much about what made a single fertilised cell grow into a human. Or – for that matter – a dog, a sea urchin, a worm or a whale. The problem was nobody could imagine how a microscopic bag of chemicals could possibly split in half again and again, yet still…

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Printing tissues News

by Pat, 26 April 2013 | 0 comments

Last year Science by Email reported how 3D printers could print out chemicals. Now scientists from Oxford University are using 3D printing to create materials that mimic biological tissues.

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Detecting doping News

by Pat, 1 February 2013 | 0 comments

An EPO molecule.

Recent interviews with cyclist Lance Armstrong made headlines around the world. He admitted to the use of performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France. Scientists have overcome many hurdles to develop the drug testing that underpins this revelation.

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