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anatomy and physiology posts

This DNA has lumps News

by David, 26 April 2018 | 0 comments

Image through a microscope, magnifying spiral strands and shapes on a blue background

Inside most cells in your body, there’s a copy of your entire genetic code. It contains instructions that help build and maintain your body. If you imagine DNA in its double helix form, it’s a beautiful, perfect package. Except, maybe DNA doesn’t always look so perfect after all.

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The language of time News

by David, 5 October 2017 | 0 comments

A sand timer on a road.

How do you imagine time? Is it a road, with the future fading off into the distance? Or is it an ocean, slowly draining as we spend our precious seconds? Surprisingly, the way you imagine time might affect the way you experience it!

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Microscope: Sleepy sunshine News

by David, 12 April 2017 | 0 comments

Double Helix magazine is looking for your science questions! Our Microscope column answers the thorniest science queries you can throw at us. Email us at Helix.Editor@csiro.au or via our contact details below and you could have your question published. Here’s a sample question to get you thinking. Aisha Goshti asks: Why does the Sun makes…

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How tall are you, really? Activity

by David, 30 March 2016 | 0 comments

Someone is standing next to a wall. Someone else is holding a book end above their head.

You might think you know your height, but this activity might change your mind. How tall are you, really?

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Frozen poo pills News

by Jasmine, 7 November 2014 | 0 comments

Pills of frozen poo

Written by Julia Cleghorn As gross as it may sound, doctors are now trialling poo to treat some patients. In a new study, capsules full of fecal matter – otherwise known as poo – have been found to cure infections in the intestines!

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A Nobel mind map News

by Mike, 10 October 2014 | 0 comments

People in a shopping centre

It’s three in the morning. Nature calls. You stagger from your bed, squinting in the darkness as you blindly weave your way past a bookshelf, around the glass cabinet, and down the corridor into the smallest room in the house. Not only do the scientists John O’Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser understand how your…

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Bioprinting blood vessels News

by David, 25 July 2014 | 0 comments

Written by Sarah Kellett 3D printers can create toys, bicycle parts and models of dinosaur bones. Bioprinters are 3D printers with a difference. They can actually print structures containing living cells, the same kind of cells that make up the human body!

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Gold test for diabetes News

by David, 18 July 2014 | 0 comments

Structure of insulin

Written by Sarah Kellett Researchers have made a cheap and rapid new test to diagnose type 1 diabetes using a gold-studded glass chip.

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Decoding binary numbers Activity

by David, 13 January 2014 | 4 comments

Zeroes and ones on a blue and green background. ©iStock.com\ivanastar

Written by Gabrielle Tramby In this activity you’ll do maths like a computer. It’s a bit tricky, so younger readers may want to read the ‘What’s Happening?’ section first.

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A touchy subject News

by Pat, 20 September 2013 | 0 comments

Hand.

Our senses allow us to perceive what is around us. Without them, it would be very difficult to navigate our world.  We have many senses, and scientists have recently discovered just how sensitive one of them is – touch.

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