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Five ways Indigenous science is helping us understand the world around us

By David, 7 July 2015

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Did you know that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have been employing scientific methods of data collection, such as observation and experimentation, for tens of thousands of years – long before western science came to Australia?

As the world’s oldest continuous living cultures, Indigenous Australians are renowned for their historic and enduring high-level science inquiry skills.

Which is why this summer, we’re inviting Australia’s brightest Year 10 Indigenous students from across the country to the Aboriginal Summer School for Excellence in Technology and Science (ASSETS). They’ll be able to share and learn more about their cultural heritage while experiencing hands-on science with some of Australia’s top science institutions such as CSIRO, James Cook University, the University of Adelaide and the University of Newcastle.

Because we want to inspire the next generation of Aboriginal scientists and Torres Strait Islander scientists – and because it’s NAIDOC week – we thought we would share five of our favourite projects that rely on Indigenous scientific knowledge.

Scroll through our image gallery and learn more.

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After the success of last year’s ASSETS program we have expanded the intake from one group of 30 students, to three groups accommodating 100 students.

The nine-day summer schools will be held in Adelaide, Newcastle and Townsville during December 2015 and January 2016. There’s no cost for students to attend with return airfares, accommodation and meals all provided.

Applications are now open on our website.

ASSETS is part of a broader Indigenous science, technology, engineering and mathematics education program managed by CSIRO in partnership with the BHP Billiton Foundation. 

 

This post is originally from the CSIRO News Blog.

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