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Twisted fiction Fiction

by Jasmine Fellows, 13 November 2012 | 0 comments

Alien creature in the snow

Brain freeze Written by Tom Dullemond We’d only lived on Terminus for a week and seen nothing but blizzards. Finally, it was a clear cold day, and mum’s company had just delivered the latest snow tractor.

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Science by the people News

by Pat, 9 November 2012 | 0 comments

Rainbow lorikeets feeding.

Citizen science is on the rise. More and more, amateurs, or ‘citizen scientists’ are given opportunities to help scientists.

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Seeing the errors of our ways News

by Pat, 6 November 2012 | 0 comments

If you read scientific reports closely, you will come across words such as error and uncertainty. What do they mean? If a teacher tells you that you made an error on a test, then you got something wrong. In everyday language, that’s what error often means – a mistake.

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The whole tooth and nothing but the tooth News

by Mike, 2 November 2012 | 0 comments

Skull of a placoderm, an ancient type of fish

Say cheese and flash that beautiful smile. You should be proud of those choppers; after all, teeth have been around for nearly half a billion years.

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Dinosaurs not fat, but big boned News

by Mike, 30 October 2012 | 4 comments

Sauropod and human

Written by Emma Bastian How do you weigh a dinosaur? It’s a simple question with a very complex answer.

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Water, water everywhere? News

by Pat, 26 October 2012 | 0 comments

A dam

It’s a small molecule, made of oxygen and hydrogen atoms in a V-shape. It’s colourless, odourless and expands when it freezes into a solid. It’s water, and without it, we wouldn’t be here.

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Great balls of lightning News

by Pat, 19 October 2012 | 0 comments

Nineteenth century depiction of ball lightning

You’re at home, sitting on the couch. Outside, there is thunder and lightning. You notice something at the window: a strange, glowing ball of light. As you watch, it appears to pass through the glass. It wanders through the air before abruptly disappearing.

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Mimic memory Activity

by David Shaw, 13 October 2012 | 0 comments

Butterflies

These mimic activities are about memory. To do them well, you need to remember exactly what you saw. Your brain makes memories in a few stages. Sensory memory describes what happens when you briefly see an object. It lasts just a split second, however.

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Cells can go back to the start News

by Pat, 12 October 2012 | 0 comments

Mature cells such as these neurons develop from immature pluripotent cells.

The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been jointly awarded to Sir John B. Gurdon and Professor Shinya Yamanaka. They received the award ‘for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent’. What does that mean?

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Element 113 spotted News

by Pat, 5 October 2012 | 0 comments

Artist's impression of colliding nuclei.

A few months ago, Science by Email reported on the naming of two superheavy elements, flerovium and livermorium. Now a team from Japan has reported making a third atom of another, new superheavy element with an atomic number of 113.

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