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Build your own International Space Station

By Jas, 17 August 2012 Activity

A paper model of a space station.You will need

 

What to do

 

Follow the instructions you have downloaded and you will have your very own model of the International Space Station! You can also play the video below to see the steps involved.

What’s happening

The International Space Station (ISS) is the largest and most complicated spacecraft ever built. It is being constructed by a collaboration of one hundred thousand people, hundreds of companies, and sixteen nations spread over four continents.

The space station is in a low Earth orbit and can be seen from Earth with the unaided eye. It orbits at an altitude of about 350 kilometres above the Earth and travels at an average speed of 27 700 kilometres per hour, orbiting the Earth 16 times a day!

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24 comments

  1. But what if u cant download the paper thing

      Reply
    1. The ISS link is above where it says “You will need” and then click International Space Station paper model.

        Reply
  2. Did you just use regular paper, or cardstock?

      Reply
    1. Hi Rena,
      I’m not sure what we used – this activity is originally from 2009. However, given the shininess in the video, it might have been photo paper. If using card, I’d make it quite thin – you need to make some pretty tight rolls to make the cylindrical modules.

      Sorry I couldn’t help more,
      David

        Reply
    2. Cardstock is preferred. You can use 165 gm (90 lb of weight) cardstock. The model on the video is the actual printout that was included in the CSIRO magazine as a pullout template. You can use glossy cardstock, too.

        Reply
      1. Thank you, Alfonso! This is going to be a fun entry event for my PBLU on Astronomy! -Rena

          Reply
        1. You’re welcome, Rena. Have fun!

            Reply
  3. Hey!
    I was wondering is i can make it with regular paper?

      Reply
    1. I was wondering *IF* I can make it with regular paper?

        Reply
      1. Hi,
        You can use regular paper but card stock is preferred. With regular paper the model will be to weak, too flimsy.

          Reply
        1. would it still work tho?

            Reply
          1. Yes.

              
    2. Hi Phoebe,
      Yup, you can use regular paper if you want. You will have to be a bit more careful though!

        Reply
  4. How big is the model?

      Reply
    1. It’s 11.5 in by 8 in (inches)

        Reply
  5. i like it

      Reply
  6. Can you use Elmers glue?

      Reply
    1. Hi Nandan,
      Elmers glue (or any other PVA based glue) will definitely hold, but it might take a while to dry. Just be careful and you’ll be okay.

      Good luck!

        Reply
    2. Yes, Elmer’s glue can be used.

        Reply
  7. My husband isn’t super keen on Christmas and is a very science/astronomy based kinda guy… to get him feeling in the Christmas spirit I’m going to print this out tomorrow eve and make it with him to put on top of our Christmas tree. Compromise at its best 😉

      Reply
  8. The video does not show where and how to glue the last component, the Airlock “O”, to the model. It does not show which way to orient the tabs or whether to bend them.

      Reply
    1. The sticking out lumps are part of the airlock and not tabs for gluing:
      https://www.nasa.gov/images/content/554263main_s134e009307_hires.jpg
      The airlock goes on the Unity module – you can find the right spot by matching the symbols.
      This might help with orientation:
      https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/structure/iss_assembly_7a.html

        Reply
      1. Patrick,
        I can send you a photo of the model showing the area in detail. Contact me at
        axmpssm@gmail.com so I can send you the photo.

          Reply
        1. Hi Alphonso. Can you send me a photo of the model as well. Send it to piquita@gmail.com.

            Reply

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